The Great Grief: How To Cope with Losing Our World
2015/11/15
By : Per Espen Stoknes


These quotes and statistics underscore the reality that many prefer to avoid or not dwell in-this Mordor-esque land of eco-anxiety, anger, despair, and depression. One of denial's essential life-enhancing functions is to keep us more comfortable by blotting out this inner, wintry darkness.

The climate survey, however, also has this encouraging finding: "Americans are nine times more likely to lean toward the view that it is people's responsibility to care for the Earth and its resources (62%) than toward the belief that it is our right to use the Earth and its resources for our own benefit (7%)."

So, what if instead of continuing to avoid this hurt and grief and despair, or only blaming them-the corporations, politicians, agrobusinesses, loggers, or corrupt bureaucrats-for it, we could try to lean into, and accept such feelings. We could acknowledge them for what they are rather than dismissing them as wrong, as a personal weakness or somebody else's fault. It seems, somehow, important to persist and get in touch with the despair itself, as it arises from the degradation of the natural world. As a culture we may uncover some truths hinted at by feelings we tend to discredit as depressive. These truths include that they accurately reflect the state of ecology in our world. More than half of all animals gone in the last forty years, according to the Living Planet Index. Most ecosystems are being degraded or used unsustainably, according to Millennium Assessment Report. We're living inside a mass extinction event, says many biologists, but without hardly consciously noticing.

In order to respond adequately, we may need to mourn these losses. Insufficient mourning keeps us numb or stuck in anger at them, which only feeds the cultural polarization. But for this to happen, the presence of supportive voices and models are needed. It is far harder to get acceptance of our difficulty and despair, and to mourn without someone else's explicit affirmation and empathy.

Contact with the pain of the world, however, does not only bring grief but can also open the heart to reach out to all things still living. It holds the potential to break open the psychic numbing. Maybe there is also community to be found among like-hearted people, among those who also can admit they've been touched by this "Great Grief," feeling the Earth's sorrow, each in their own way. Not just individual mourning is needed, but a shared process that leads onwards to public re-engagement in cultural solutions. Working out our own answers as honestly as we can, as individuals and as communities, is rapidly becoming a requirement for psychological health.

To cope with losing our world requires us to descend through the anger into mourning and sadness, not speedily bypass them to jump onto the optimism bandwagon or escape into indifference. And with this deepening, an extended caring and gratitude may open us to what is still here, and finally, to acting accordingly.

Per Espen Stoknes is a psychologist, an economist, and an entrepreneur who has cofounded clean-energy companies. He spearheads the BI Norwegian Business School's executive program on green growth. He has written three books, including
What We Think About When We Try Not To Think About Global Warming. He lives in Oslo, Norway. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License
Bookmark and Share
Page 2
Copyright © 2019 Compathos Foundation unless indicated as Creative Commons.
Compathos is a 501(c) (3) non-profit educational media organization.
Website maintained by Robert's Consulting Service